Dale Allsopp on preparing for success, what makes Google Finance different, and following your passion

Finance Googler Dale Allsopp was on hand to ring the NASDAQ closing bell with students from Prep for Prep, an organization Allsopp works with. Photos © Copyright 2016 Nasdaq

As a kid growing up in Brooklyn, Dale Allsopp was accepted into Prep for Prep, a program that places underprivileged students into New York’s top independent day and boarding schools after a rigorous, 14-month educational bootcamp. Prep for Prep set Allsopp—now a senior manager in finance—on his course to Google. It also informed his core values, helping him hone his focus on community service. Whether he's organizing mentoring sessions or sponsoring business plan competitions, Dale's impact extends far beyond the office.

He says, "When I think of leadership or my core values, I think of service. What am I doing to improve the community around me? How am I using my experiences to make it easier for someone else to get to where I am now?”

What’s it like to work in Finance at a tech company like Google?
First of all, it’s hard to imagine another company’s Finance team being as focused on big data and extracting insights as we are. In comparison to other finance jobs I’ve had, we’re much more focused on financial strategy. We strive to be a trusted advisor to other parts of the business, and access to data enables us to be just that. Google leadership values Finance’s independence and requires a thoughtful, data-driven view that challenges their perceptions.

Additionally, Finance brings an unbiased rigor to any conversation. It’s not an afterthought. Google is a product-driven company, and our leaders in that area are keenly focused on revenue, performance trends, and profitability—all squarely in the sweet spot of our team.

Finally, more traditional companies I’ve worked at in the past allowed for 3-month deep dives. At Google it’s generally 2 weeks…or less. Everything is faster and more nimble.

What’s your favorite part of working at Google?
If you care deeply about a topic, Google will support you in your endeavors. Personally, I’m passionate about introducing tech and entrepreneurship opportunities to underrepresented groups. This is my personal mission, and Google has supported me tremendously in my efforts.

Any advice for students or people early on in their careers?
I tell young people to focus on what excites you—it’s much easier to be passionate, proactive, or motivated when you’re enjoying what you do. Ask yourself one question: What activity do I gravitate towards when I lose track of time? Got something in mind? Now explore careers that are related to that activity.

Also, if you have an interest in finance or tech, it’s very important to get comfortable with querying data and using tools like SQL. It’s easier to hit the ground running and make an impact right away when you already know how to access information.

What would you say to someone who’s not sure if they should apply to Google?

This may sound blunt, but if the job is within your area of expertise, there aren’t many reasons for you not to apply.

You do a lot of community work outside of your day job. Can you tell us about it?

Each June, I take part in GoogleServe (the company-wide service program). The past two years, I’ve organized mentoring sessions for local non-profits, such as Student Dream and Cofound Harlem. For the last four years, I’ve also sponsored the Institute for Entrepreneurship, which is a business plan competition that pairs Prep for Prep students with Google mentors. Finally, I’m in the process of working with a black-owned business that’s looking to transform itself and enter the digital space.

What makes you so passionate about partnering with local organizations?
It all goes back to empathy. When I think about Prep for Prep—which is a huge reason why I’m here today—I think about Gary Simons, the organization’s founder. He was a teacher from the South Bronx, who empathized with the plight of minorities in underprivileged areas of New York. In roughly 40 years, his mission has touched over 4,000 souls. That’s the example we should all look to, and that’s why I care so much about giving back to this community.

Dale Allsopp on preparing for success, what makes Google Finance different, and following your passion

Finance Googler Dale Allsopp was on hand to ring the NASDAQ closing bell with students from Prep for Prep, an organization Allsopp works with. Photos © Copyright 2016 Nasdaq

As a kid growing up in Brooklyn, Dale Allsopp was accepted into Prep for Prep, a program that places underprivileged students into New York’s top independent day and boarding schools after a rigorous, 14-month educational bootcamp. Prep for Prep set Allsopp—now a senior manager in finance—on his course to Google. It also informed his core values, helping him hone his focus on community service. Whether he's organizing mentoring sessions or sponsoring business plan competitions, Dale's impact extends far beyond the office.

He says, "When I think of leadership or my core values, I think of service. What am I doing to improve the community around me? How am I using my experiences to make it easier for someone else to get to where I am now?”

What’s it like to work in Finance at a tech company like Google?
First of all, it’s hard to imagine another company’s Finance team being as focused on big data and extracting insights as we are. In comparison to other finance jobs I’ve had, we’re much more focused on financial strategy. We strive to be a trusted advisor to other parts of the business, and access to data enables us to be just that. Google leadership values Finance’s independence and requires a thoughtful, data-driven view that challenges their perceptions.

Additionally, Finance brings an unbiased rigor to any conversation. It’s not an afterthought. Google is a product-driven company, and our leaders in that area are keenly focused on revenue, performance trends, and profitability—all squarely in the sweet spot of our team.

Finally, more traditional companies I’ve worked at in the past allowed for 3-month deep dives. At Google it’s generally 2 weeks…or less. Everything is faster and more nimble.

What’s your favorite part of working at Google?
If you care deeply about a topic, Google will support you in your endeavors. Personally, I’m passionate about introducing tech and entrepreneurship opportunities to underrepresented groups. This is my personal mission, and Google has supported me tremendously in my efforts.

Any advice for students or people early on in their careers?
I tell young people to focus on what excites you—it’s much easier to be passionate, proactive, or motivated when you’re enjoying what you do. Ask yourself one question: What activity do I gravitate towards when I lose track of time? Got something in mind? Now explore careers that are related to that activity.

Also, if you have an interest in finance or tech, it’s very important to get comfortable with querying data and using tools like SQL. It’s easier to hit the ground running and make an impact right away when you already know how to access information.

What would you say to someone who’s not sure if they should apply to Google?

This may sound blunt, but if the job is within your area of expertise, there aren’t many reasons for you not to apply.

You do a lot of community work outside of your day job. Can you tell us about it?

Each June, I take part in GoogleServe (the company-wide service program). The past two years, I’ve organized mentoring sessions for local non-profits, such as Student Dream and Cofound Harlem. For the last four years, I’ve also sponsored the Institute for Entrepreneurship, which is a business plan competition that pairs Prep for Prep students with Google mentors. Finally, I’m in the process of working with a black-owned business that’s looking to transform itself and enter the digital space.

What makes you so passionate about partnering with local organizations?
It all goes back to empathy. When I think about Prep for Prep—which is a huge reason why I’m here today—I think about Gary Simons, the organization’s founder. He was a teacher from the South Bronx, who empathized with the plight of minorities in underprivileged areas of New York. In roughly 40 years, his mission has touched over 4,000 souls. That’s the example we should all look to, and that’s why I care so much about giving back to this community.